Ethiopian Energy^Power Business Portal

(thereporterethiopa/Birhanu Fikade, 5 May 2018)

State owned consulting firm stretches to Tanzania, Nigeria . The Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity (MoWIE) has inked an agreement with the Ethiopian Construction Design & Supervision Works Corporation to conduct a pre-feasibility and feasibility studies for the construction of a 150 Megawatt (MW) Wabi Hydroelectric power project in the Southern Regional State. The contract agreement, which was signed on Thursday, has commissioned the Corporation to conduct a study to establish the feasibility of a new power project designed to have 150 MW hydropower in the Gurage Zone of the Southern Region.

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(atlanticcouncil/J. PETER PHAM, 3 April 2018)

The April 2 anniversary of the laying of the foundation stone of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) in 2011 passed largely unremarked amid the cascade of momentous news coming recently from Ethiopia, including several years of unrest, the sudden release of thousands of detainees in mid-February, the resignation of the prime minister one day later, the declaration of a state of emergency the day after that, as well as the ensuing intense deliberations within the governing Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Democratic Front, culminating in the election of a new coalition chairman and his swearing-in this week as prime minister, the first such constitutional handover in the millennial history of the Ethiopian state. Yet it would not be an exaggeration to say that, as the GERD approaches completion, its strategic geopolitical and socioeconomic impact on Ethiopia and, indeed, the entire Northeast Africa region may prove greater than of any of the developments that have lately filled the news.

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(Alastair Leithead/bbc, 24 Feb 2018)

A new dam on the Nile could trigger a war over water unless Ethiopia can agree a deal with Egypt and Sudan, writes the BBC's Africa Correspondent Alastair Leithead.

It is often said the world's next world war will be fought over water and there are few places as tense as the River Nile.

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Solar home systems can help to bridge the electrification gap in developing countries—if certain conditions are met.

About a billion people have no access to electricity. While progress in lessening that figure has been steady, it is still likely to be at least 870 million in 2020.1Expanding the grid is part of the answer to the question of how to bring power to these people, but it is not the only one. Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia,2which make up 90 percent of the world’s unelectrified population, are also exploring off-grid solutions, including solar home systems (SHSs). So are countries in the Caribbean and Southeast Asia, which account for most of the remaining unelectrified population. The global market for SHSs has grown 23 percent a year since 2012,3representing more than four million units installed.

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